By Kyla Camille | Fotograpiya

Ralph Matthew Gabriel, a sophomore AB Multimedia student from Southville International School and Colleges is slowly making a name for himself in Las Pinas as a local photographer. One of his college professors, Vito Arnel Villanueva was impressed by Matthew’s work. Matthew recalls the professor asking him, where he had learned his skills in photography. Matthew said that he was inspired by his uncle Ronald’s work. Ronald, an architect by profession, has maintained his photography hobby and has been practicing it in Hongkong. According to Matthew, Villanueva observed that he had the stance of a professional photographer.

Matthew vividly remembers the tips given to him by his uncle. He shares one of those tips with us here in Fotograpiya,

Correct stance. Most photographers ignore the important aspect of body position. It is not limited to holding the camera in your hands alone. Many people lean forward, leaving their arms to hold the camera steady. Much like lifting a heavy object, the weight is best handled by your legs so adapt your step to fit these guidelines:

  1. Remember to hold the camera with both hands. The left hand must always be on the lens, while the right holds the camera body firmly and controls the shutter.
  2. Take a half step forward and keep your knees bent. This posture will evenly distribute your weight over both of your legs.
  3. Level the camera to your common shooting position. For compact camera, the photographer must hold the camera at eye level, about 15 cm in front of the face. DSLR cameras must be held firmly in front of your right eye.
  4. Squeeze your elbows tightly against your sides. The left forearm should be completely vertical and behind your toes. Avoid the temptation to lean forward and take the weight off your legs; leaning forward will result in a camera shake and a blurred photo.
  5. Take a deep breath and let the air out. Before taking the next breath, press the shutter as gently as possible.

Matthew adds that he is still in a ‘learning’ phase, and is excited to learn more about the tricks of the trade.

Below are samples of Matthew’s work.

 

silhouette
Silhouette | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel

 

Waterscape | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel
Waterscape | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel

 

Sunrise | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel
Sunrise | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel

 

Playtime | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel
Playtime | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel

 

Lolo | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel
Lolo | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel

 

GABRIELprelim
Alone in the Dark | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel

 

Crowd | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel
Crowd | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel

 

Men@Work | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel
Men@Work | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel

 

Night Scene | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel
Night Scene | Photo by Ralph Matthew Gabriel